Archive for Climate Change

Construction Corner: Flood waters continue to rise in a warming world

June 23, Daily Commercial News:

Climate change is often seen as posing the greatest threat to the world’s coastal areas.

But inland cities face perils of their own, including more intense storms and more frequent flooding.

Revised flood forecasts from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has got inland American cities scrambling. It seems that many of their bridges are going to be too low to cope with increased river flows as the climate warms.

A little more than a decade ago the city of Des Moines, Iowa, spruced up an old train trestle, turning it into a pedestrian and cycling pathway across the Des Moines River. But little more than a decade later, crews were back to the site with a crane to hoist the span 1.4 metres at a cost of $3 million. That was after the corps concluded that the river’s flood risk was nearly double earlier estimates. Read more.

The Water Brothers Visit ELA To Learn About Climate Change

On Friday March 24, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. (EST) join TVO’s The Water Brothers as they visit IISD Experimental Lakes Area to learn how climate change is affecting our water.

The episode On Thin Ice will broadcast on the television channel TVO in Ontario at that time, and then will be available for free streaming across Canada on The Water Brothers’ website the next day.

On Thin Ice looks at how climate change might affect Canada’s fresh water, and explores what Canadian scientists are doing about it. When the Water Brothers came to the site last year, they took part in a wide range of experiments determining how warming waters and reduced lake ice cover is harming freshwater ecosystems.

Manitoba’s Climate and Green Plan – Your Input is Needed by March 19

What do you want to see in Manitoba’s Climate and Green Plan?

Take a moment to make sure your voice is heard by filling out this surveyThe province is looking for public input until Sunday, March 19th.

It will help guide policy development on climate change issues including carbon taxing, wetland conservation, sustainable agriculture, active transportation and composting.

Man-made wetlands can solve flooding, drought problems

February 6, Saskatoon StarPhoenix:

Prairie municipalities preparing for a hotter future, with increasing spring floods and summer drought, need to invest in “green infrastructure” the head of Winnipeg’s Prairie Climate Centre says.

“Green infrastructure is the ability of the landscape, if well managed, to absorb the shocks of climate change, both flood and drought … Investment in green infrastructure is a critical form of climate adaptation,” said Hank Venema, an environmental system engineer who head the Climate Centre at the University of Winnipeg. Read more.