Archive for Climate Change

Airborne surveys examine water levels of lakes perched on permafrost

Jennifer Leman, December 14, 2017

Northern Canada is speckled with lakes. And those lakes tell stories, according to Tamlin Pavelsky, an associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Pavelsky and other researchers are using data from a series of flights flown for NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) to understand how permafrost—which rests beneath roughly 50% of Canada and 80% of Alaska—affects the lakes that lie above it.

The goal is to understand “whether there’s a relationship to water levels in lakes and whether or not there’s permafrost underneath them,” said Pavelsky. He presented the team’s research methods in a poster session on 12 December at the American Geophysical Union’s 2017 Fall Meeting in New Orleans, La.

Manitoba’s Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan. Your input is important!

As you are likely aware, the province recently launched their Made in Manitoba Climate and Green Plan.  One of the pillars of this plan includes water.  Information and proposed suggestions on how to address water issues can be found on pages 9, 33-49 and 52.  You can download a copy of the plan here – Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan and provide your comments regarding how the plan addresses water issue in the province here – views, ideas, and suggestions

Lake trout ‘a canary in a coal mine’ for climate change: researcher

Aug. 15, CBC News:

A new study out of the University of Manitoba shows some lake predators are changing their behaviour due to climate change, which may have a wide-ranging effect on aquatic ecosystems.

Researchers watched the feeding habits of lake trout at the IISD Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario over an 11-year span and found the fish can quickly adapt their behaviour — moving to deeper and cooler parts of the lake to feed — as water temperatures rise.

Matthew Guzzo, a PhD candidate in the U of M’s department of biological sciences and lead author of the study published in the proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, said as temperatures rise, lake trout move from shallow, more productive waters to the deep part of the lake where water is cooler but food is of a lower quality. Read more.

How the Climate Crisis is changing our rivers

So much of the reporting on how the climate crisis is affecting water systems has centered on shrinking sea ice, glacial melt, and sea-level rise that it’s easy to forget that the crisis impacts every drop of H2O on the earth’s surface.

From the tiny stream in your grandmother’s backyard that you played in as a child to the mighty rivers that transport goods, power towns and cities, and provide recreation and fresh water to millions, waterways large and small are being transformed by climate change – and far quicker than even experts had predicted.

This spring, scientists studying Arctic river ice revealed what is being described as “the first case of large-scale river reorganization as a result of human-caused climate change,” according to the Washington Post. Read more.