Archive for Climate Change

Event: Disentangling the Impacts of Climate Change and Human Interventions on the Hydrology of Key Canadian Watersheds

This presentation will explore climate change and flow regulation impacts on daily and annual river discharge variations and trends into Hudson Bay, the Nechako and Fraser River Basins over the past half-century or so. The first part of the presentation will focus on the 3.7 million km2 Hudson Bay drainage basin for which daily observed streamflow data from the Water Survey of Canada, Manitoba Hydro, Ontario Power Generation and Hydro-Québec for 21 rivers were used to analyze the basin from 1960 to 2016. Decadal hydrographs were developed to assess the changing hydrological regimes in both regulated and unregulated sub-basins and spectral analyses are used to infer the dominant modes of temporal variability on the river discharge input to Hudson Bay. While the unregulated systems exhibit signals of climate change, these remain secondary relative to flow regulation even at the larger Hudson Bay drainage basin scale. More information and registration.

Water Action Decade Event

The International Decade for Action, ‘Water for Sustainable Development’, commenced on World Water Day, 22 March 2018, and aims to accelerate efforts towards meeting water-related challenges, including limited access to safe water and sanitation, increasing pressure on water resources and ecosystems, and an exacerbated risk of droughts and floods. This session will include presentations from UN-DESA, UNU and other members of the UN-Water Task Force on Decade Implementation, and bring participants up to speed on the current state of the Decade implementation and how to get involved.

Airborne surveys examine water levels of lakes perched on permafrost

Jennifer Leman, December 14, 2017

Northern Canada is speckled with lakes. And those lakes tell stories, according to Tamlin Pavelsky, an associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Pavelsky and other researchers are using data from a series of flights flown for NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) to understand how permafrost—which rests beneath roughly 50% of Canada and 80% of Alaska—affects the lakes that lie above it.

The goal is to understand “whether there’s a relationship to water levels in lakes and whether or not there’s permafrost underneath them,” said Pavelsky. He presented the team’s research methods in a poster session on 12 December at the American Geophysical Union’s 2017 Fall Meeting in New Orleans, La.

Manitoba’s Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan. Your input is important!

As you are likely aware, the province recently launched their Made in Manitoba Climate and Green Plan.  One of the pillars of this plan includes water.  Information and proposed suggestions on how to address water issues can be found on pages 9, 33-49 and 52.  You can download a copy of the plan here – Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan and provide your comments regarding how the plan addresses water issue in the province here – views, ideas, and suggestions