Canadian cities rethink removal of fluoride from tap water

Jan. 24, 2019 – CBC News

It shouldn’t be up to cities to decide to add fluoride to drinking water, but provincial officials, a Canadian mayor says.

Windsor, Ont., is bucking a national trend and looking at lifting its ban on adding fluoride to drinking water after seeing an increase in cavities among children.

Community water fluoridation is recommended by public health, medical and dental groups, including the Canadian and American Dental Associations, Canada’s Chief Dental Officer and the World Health Organization. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention called its contribution to the decline in cavities one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century.  

Fluoride is a mineral that binds to the enamel of teeth, strengthening them to prevent bacterial decay.

But ever since Canadian communities first introduced fluoridation in 1945, some cities have gritted their teeth at the contentious addition, and the debate continues. Some Windsor city council members initially argued that fluoride could be obtained cheaply from toothpaste and other critics have presented general fears over adding chemicals to water supplies. 

A 2018 review by the¬†Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health¬†evaluated dozens of studies on the health effects associated with fluoridation. “The evidence in this review supports the protective role of community water fluoridation in reducing dental caries [cavities] in children and adults,” the authors concluded. READ MORE.