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Depave Paradise Success!

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On May 28th, the Brooklands School community came together to transform a paved space along the school, into a beautiful outdoor education space. Over 100

Lack of access to sewage treatment, basic sanitation plague Shoal Lake 40: report

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SHOAL LAKE, Ont. — Kavin Redsky is pushing a front-loader trying to keep garbage off the road. Down the street, untreated raw sewage is seeping

Big bills set to flow in St. Andrews

A new bill could soon arrive in Irene Boyko’s mailbox and she fears it’ll more than just a drop in the bucket. “We’re not too

No completion date in the pipe for $795M North End sewage-plant upgrades

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A massive sewage-treatment project ordered up by the province in 2003 won’t be finished by the City of Winnipeg until the 2020s. Upgrades to the

Sewage overflows eight times bigger than first thought

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About eight times more of what you flush down the toilet is overflowing from combined sewers and entering local waterways than the city once thought.

Washed out roads in Whiteshell leave Winnipeggers stranded

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Stranded resort guests in the Whiteshell are evacuating Sunday. Falcon Trails Resort guests Taylor McMillan and Pete Moore arrived Friday evening looking forward to a

Washed out roads in Whiteshell leave Winnipeggers stranded

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Stranded resort guests in the Whiteshell are evacuating Sunday.

Falcon Trails Resort guests Taylor McMillan and Pete Moore arrived Friday evening looking forward to a relaxing weekend, until heavy rains washed out the only road back to Winnipeg.

The couple tried to evacuate Saturday, but by the time they packed up, it was too late to leave.

The road was flooded and eroding.

“People tried to leave with a Toyota Corolla and they had no chance,” said McMillan.

Saturday, the province issued voluntarily evacuations for people in the Whiteshell area. Read more.

Big bills set to flow in St. Andrews

A new bill could soon arrive in Irene Boyko’s mailbox and she fears it’ll more than just a drop in the bucket.

“We’re not too happy about the money to put out,” said the RM of St. Andrews homeowner.

Right now Boyko and homeowners in the RM of ST. Andrews use septic fields and tanks that handle wastewater. But they can leak or overflow causing run-off. In 2011, the province outlawed the use of septic fields along a stretch of the Red River corridor in St. Andrews.

The municipality is set to vote on a new sewer system that will cost each impacted homeowner $7,300 dollars, plus a $200 dollar annual fee paid to the City of Winnipeg. Read more.

Homemade pirate ship sailing on St. Malo Lake

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If you see a pirate ship cruising the waters of St. Malo this summer, you’re not imagining things.

When Bruno Hebert arrived back home in St. Malo, Manitoba following a Mexico vacation with his kids, he declared he’d build a pirate ship like the one they saw on holiday. This spring the family saw his vision become a reality. Hebert and his 15-year-old son Erik started building the boat out of plywood and random items they had laying around the garage over the winter between evening hockey games.

“I was pretty confident,” said Hebert about his under taking. While neighbors and friends doubted they’d see it come to life, they were there on launch day this spring. Now it’s become a regular water craft for Hebert and his family. A boat, he expects to last for generations. See full article.

Sewage overflows eight times bigger than first thought

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About eight times more of what you flush down the toilet is overflowing from combined sewers and entering local waterways than the city once thought.

In fact, nearly 7.3 billion litres of diluted sewage — enough to fill 2,915 Olympic swimming pools — spilled out of Winnipeg’s sewer system during 2013 alone.

The city has often reported about 900 million litres of wastewater overflows into our rivers when rainfall or snow melt events overtax the city’s combined sewers. But when the city’s monitoring technology improved in 2013, it soon found the true amount of waste getting into the water is actually much higher.

The situation was even more dire in 2014 and 2015, when the volume soared to 9.3 billion litres and 12.5 billion litres, respectively. But the city says a wet weather cycle during those years skewed the results, making 2013 likely the most accurate data yet. Read more.